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I am new to the tutoring community and but we have had CRLA training
available to our tutors and that has helped them understand that learning
is in the hands of the student not the tutor.  We try to impress upon our
students that we can not help them if they are not prepared to learn.  We
expect them to bring:  assignment, rubrics and attempts to us before we can
help them.
I just had a student yesterday who had not read the assignment and wanted
me to give her the answer to an online quiz.  I made her get out her book
and look it up.
My philosophy is the old bible saying:  Give a man a fish and he eats for a
day, teach him to fish and he eats for a lifetime.

If you enforce the bringing of all class materials to a tutoring session
they will learn to learn which is the most important skill you can give
them.

Respectfully
Cynthia

On Thu, Oct 6, 2016 at 9:35 PM, William G Hardaway <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> Hello Annette,
>
> The visit data for our institutions is identical and the structure of our
> services is exactly the same. Although, I wish we had 100 tutors :-),
> because we have around 40. With that said, if you are willing to talk, I
> would love to ask how you got to 100 tutors.
>
> We have had similar challenges with problem focused students and a lack of
> preparation. Here are a few things we do including signage solutions:
>
>
>    - When we reach out to faculty we get their support in encouraging
>    preparation from students when they refer them
>    - Include expectations and a description of the learning environment
>    in literature and emails directed to students
>    - Give printed expectations to as many first-time (ever) visitors as
>    possible
>    - We use cards to signal whether students are busy or not and in the
>    cards we further impress upon them to get work done even in the absence of
>    tutors
>    - Our tutors reinforce this by explaining their process and why they
>    are approaching the learning opportunity with the strategies they are; some
>    students may leave upset and if the environment is welcoming and positive
>    they typically return
>    - Initially it may take a campaign to campus students, faculty, and
>    staff that helps describe the challenge students are having and help them
>    understand the benefits of learning concepts in pursuit of getting homework
>    finished rather than the other way around
>    -
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *-Don't forget to learn.*
> ------------------------------
> William G. Hardaway
> Academic Support Coordinator
> Fresno State Learning Center
> [log in to unmask]
> 559.278.3052
> Tutoring Schedule:  http://bit.ly/tutsched
>
> ------------------------------
> *From: *"Annette Klier" <[log in to unmask]>
> *To: *[log in to unmask]
> *Sent: *Thursday, October 6, 2016 4:57:30 PM
> *Subject: *Students Preparation
>
>
> Hello everyone,
>
>
>
> I am seeking some suggestions of signage anyone might be using to inform
> students that they are expected to come prepared to tutoring.  Our tutoring
> center serves just over 13K student visits each year with over 100 tutors.
> About 90% of our work is on a drop-in basis.  Appointments are primarily
> for writing (though we will allow drop-in there as well) and special
> accommodation for students registered with OSD (Office for students with
> Disabilities).  Core values of the college include sustainability and
> innovation which has led to more student work online including OER (Open
> Education Resource) textbooks.
>
> 1)      We are noticing a significant upswing in the number of students
> who do not bring (or even own) a textbook.  Our library does keep multiple
> copies of most textbooks on reserve which can be checked out for 2-hour
> intervals yet students still consistently ask our tutors to provide one.
>
> 2)      Students are coming in with online homework assignments (which
> allow 3-4 attempts) and asking for help with problem #1 of their first
> attempt.  Basically they have tried nothing on their own and their
> expectations are for our tutors to walk them through each problem.
>
> 3)      Students have arrived with their laptop to work on their online
> homework yet when the tutor suggests that they look up a formula in their
> OER textbook they do not even go to the trouble of opening a new browser
> tab and consulting the textbook posted on our college website, but instead
> expect the tutor to provide the formula.
>
> I would appreciate any thoughts anyone has on this issue especially if you
> have specific language you use or signage you can point to in order to
> reinforce the message that students should come prepared with some effort
> applied.  Thanks for listening,
>
>
>
> Annette Klier
>
>
>
> Math Specialist
>
> Student Academic Success
>
> Math Center, Room L132
>
> *[image: cid:[log in to unmask]]*
>
>
>
>
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-- 
Cynthia Dopp, MLIS
Reference Librarian
Baker College Jackson
2800 Springport Rd
Jackson, MI 49202
517-780-4565

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