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Dear Claude

All measurements of a tie constitute proxies of relations.  Positive, negative, indifferent and everything in between.

Your grouchy uncle is a kinship tie you have no choice over.  You may never built a relationship with him, as I would assume is the case for the majority of one's kinship network.  It could be further argued that although you do not like your uncle he could be "forced" to offer you a job by the fact that he is embedded in other relations among your kin.

A choice to interact (bar conflict) over long periods of time should indicate something about ego.  Now if one hates those interactions, is oppressed by them or consider them mandatory under some social convention there is extensive sociology and social psychology to describe their predicament.  But is is not an unreasonable assumption that interaction frequency indicates affinity.

So, although frequency and duration of interaction on its own may not give an indication of quality, the issue here is not about the measured relations but about  the variable of interest.  In this case quality, for which it would be very difficult to construct a definition.   And I agree with David and Dan that Simmelian ties can act as a proxy of something substantial in relations.  And depending on context this maybe quality, embeddedness or something else.

best

Dimitris



Dr Dimitris Christopoulos
Dean of Executive Education & MBA, 
MU Vienna
&
Associate Research Professor
Edinburgh Business School

On 10 August 2017 at 07:49, Claude S FISCHER <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
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C'mon....
Duration does not index quality --- you may have known your grouchy uncle all your life; that doesn't make it a "quality" tie.
Frequency doesn't index quality -- you may say hello to your pain-in-the-butt neighbor every day; that doesn't make it a "quality" tie.

CSF

Claude S. Fischer
Prof. of the Graduate School, Sociology

On Wed, Aug 9, 2017 at 12:53 PM, David Krackhardt <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
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​Laura,

I have to admit, I would agree with Dan that Simmelian ties is an interesting way to approach this question.   The only twist I would add is that the Simmelian argument is not one about tie strength:  It is about how embedding a tie within a group (clique) makes a qualitative difference in the relationship.  My favorite example is from Simmel himself: Consider a couple, enjoying their relationship, time together, perhaps doing some things separately, going to the movies, cooking, etc.  ​They develop a routine of activities, expectations, etc.  Then they have a kid.  All of a sudden the relationship between the two changes.  Rules of interaction change.  THe roles change.  It's not only that the relationship is stronger and more stable (it's harder to separate when there is a kid involved), it is qualitatively different, deeper, changed by being embedded in a group.   

Just thought I would add my 2 cents.

-David


 --------------------

David Krackhardt, Professor of Organizations, Executive Editor of JoSS
Heinz College of Public Policy and Management, and
     The Tepper School of Business
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
412-268-4758
website: www.andrew.cmu.edu/~krack
     (Erdos#=2)

--------------------

On Wed, Aug 9, 2017 at 8:51 AM, Laura Thomas <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
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​Dear all, 


Thank you for the ideas and articles! 


Kind regards,

Laura



---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Laura Thomas
Department of Educational Studies (office 120.97)
Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences
Henri Dunantlaan 2, B - 9000 Ghent
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Van: Dan Suthers <[log in to unmask]>
Verzonden: woensdag 9 augustus 2017 12:04
Aan: Laura Thomas
CC: [log in to unmask]; [log in to unmask]
Onderwerp: Re: [SOCNET] Quality of ties
 

Hi Laura,


More obvious measures include frequency and duration of interaction, if you have that data, or if the interaction is multimediated how it is distributed across media (see Licoppe & Smoreda 2005 in the Social Networks journal).


An interesting metric is Simmelian tie strength (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simmelian_tie): the tie between A and B is stronger to the extent that they also have mutual ties to C, D, E ... so a simple measure of tie strength is to count mutual ties (for example, starting with 1 for each other but adding 1 for each mutual associate).  To use more recent theoretical terminology this is based on social surveillance: A and B can't do each other wrong without C, D, E ... noticing.


Dan Suthers


On 8/6/17 8:40 PM, Laura Thomas wrote:
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Hi everyone,

In my research we want to measure the quality of teachers' ties. We have a couple of qualitative frameworks for this, which we explored in interviews with beginning teachers, but we also want to expand these with more quantitative measures of quality (based on their ego/whole network, dyads ...). 

The first thing that came into mind was 'reciprocity'. When a tie is reciprocial, the quality of the tie is higher (which is supported by literature). The literature concerning this matter, however, is scarce. That's why I was wondering what you were thinking? Which other network measures could be considered as an indicator of the quality of a tie? 

Thank you! 

Kind regards,
Laura






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-- 
Dan Suthers 

Dept. of Information and Computer Sciences 
University of Hawaii at Manoa 
1680 East West Road, POST 309, Honolulu, HI 96822 
(808) 956-3890 office
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~suthers/

Professor, Department of Information and Computer Sciences
  http://www.ics.hawaii.edu/
PI, Laboratory for Interactive Learning Technologies
  http://lilt.ics.hawaii.edu/

Maintain Democracy, Prevent Kleptocracy
_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.

_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.

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_____________________________________________________________________ SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.