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Dear Laura,

 

If I understand your email correctly, the literature that I know is actually against what you were suggesting. Newcomers should have fewer ties compared to nodes who join the network in the initial stages of the network development (aka preferential attachment (PA), or rich-get-richer). Examples of PA can be found in many complex systems such as citation networks, biological networks, etc. That being said, PA cannot explain the latecomers who become main hubs in the later stages. As a result, node fitness (aka fit-get-richer) process was proposed suggesting that in every network there are some variables (sometimes latent variables) that make one node more suitable to develop ties with the network compared to another one, and as a result, that specific node grows to a higher degree node much faster than the other one. Nevertheless, as far as I know, none of these two processes support what you were looking for, but it might be a good starting point.

 

Reference:

Pham, T., Sheridan, P., & Shimodaira, H. (2016). Joint estimation of preferential attachment and node fitness in growing complex networks. Scientific Reports, 6(1). https://doi.org/10.1038/srep32558

Best Regards,

Jolly

 

From: Social Networks Discussion Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Laura Thomas
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2018 10:32 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [SOCNET] Network related question concerning a newcomer in an organisation

 

***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****

Dear SOCNET'ers, 

 

I'm working on a study concerning beginning teachers. 

We gathered whole-school quantitative data three times during the school year (snapshots in time as you will) of the teacher team in the school. Furthermore, we also conducted interviews with the beginning teachers in these teacher teams three times during the school year. In these interviews we asked them to focus on the content of their ties, and the mechanisms of change. 

 

In analysing the quantitative data it appears that for a lot of teachers the number of ties increase during the school year, and that the majority obtain a more central position in the network. I was wondering if there are studies in the wider literature (literature on education, but also organisational psychological literature or other) that have already tested these hypotheses: that newcomers to an organisation acquire more ties and that they obtain a more central position? And are there other network related hypotheses concering newcomers in an organisation that I could test?‚Äč

 

Looking forward hearing from you! 

 

Kind regards,

Laura

 

 

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Laura Thomas

Department of Educational Studies (office 120.97)

Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences

Henri Dunantlaan 2, B - 9000 Ghent

+32 (0)9 264 86 60

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www.onderwijskunde.ugent.be/user.php?u=lmthomas

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