Instead of offering workshops to students, I have created a list of workshops faculty can request to have integrated into courses and tailored to curriculum. This has worked well. Students then see the application of the strategies to their course and have to attend because it is part of the course. There is also support from the professor.

 

Gina

Gina Burkart, Ed.D.

Clarke University, Dubuque, Iowa 52001

(563-588-8195 *[log in to unmask]

 

“If you have knowledge, let others light their candles in it.”~Margaret Fuller

 

From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Roberta Schotka
Sent: Thursday, March 08, 2018 10:07 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Workshop Attendance

 

We have stopped offering workshops as students are more inclined towards "just in time" experiences rather than "just in case" opportunities.  That being said though, if several students express an interest in a specific topic we will work with them as a small group. I think the difference here has more to do with the students' perceived value in planning ahead versus managing their most pressing needs (largely because they didn't plan ahead!). 

 

Also instead of long, formal workshops we have created a series of 3-5 minute video mini-workshops on key campus topics (registration, add/drop, distribution requirements, final exams, etc.) that students can access on demand through our website. 

 

Roberta

 


Roberta Schotka, Director of Programs, PLTC

Wellesley College

phone:781-283-2675

fax: 781-283-3709

[log in to unmask]

CRLA Certifications Director


Office hours click here

 

On Thu, Mar 8, 2018 at 10:37 AM, Keánu Wall <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

Hi everyone,

I saw a great post about hosting workshops based on motivation/goal setting, and it reminded
me of a question that we've been trying to solve forever now: how do we get students to
attend workshops?

We know that most students are often trying to juggle not just their classes, but also their
jobs, family, social life, etc. We find this particularly acute in the community college or
commuter college setting where students only come to campus for their classes and leave
directly after.

We reach out to students through mail merges, faculty support, and posters around campus.
We see that extra credit tends to bring out more students (marginally), although this is
granted through faculty's good graces and never requested by the tutoring center.

To be sure, there are many contributing factors, but I'm curious to see what other strategies
are out there?

Thank you for your time!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your
subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to
http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html

To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]


Clarke University
Gina Burkart | Learning Specialist Instructor of Language and Literature | Clarke University, Dubuque, IA

*This communication is the property of Clarke University and may contain privileged and confidential information. It is intended only for the use of the person(s) named above. Unauthorized use of this communication is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender and destroy all copies of the original message.*

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ To access the LRNASST-L archives or User Guide, or to change your subscription options (including subscribe/unsubscribe), point your web browser to http://www.lists.ufl.edu/archives/lrnasst-l.html To contact the LRNASST-L owner, email [log in to unmask]