Hello Kelly,

I wonder if we are so accustomed to reading screens superficially and often on the go that revisiting with students basic reading and learning principles would be important. If we are used to pond skimming when reading screens, we may need to work more deliberately to prepare to read and process information that highlight important sensory input. Some things to present might include:

 

In courses I teach, students tell me they prefer printed copies but don’t like the price they end up paying for books or printouts. I’ve never presented on this topic, nor have I researched it much. I did read some time back the Scientific American article that Saundra cited, and I think it was suggestive but far from conclusive that the brain prefers paper. I prefer paper myself.

I’m curious what others are doing to support students who read e-books, online reserves, and digitized copies and look forward to reading more responses (on my screen).

All the best,

Jeffrey

 

Jeffrey White, M.A., M.S.

Learning Commons Administrator, Shepard Academic Resource Center 

Instructor of German, International Languages and Cultures

President, Northwest College Reading and Learning Association

Buckley Center 163, MSC 184

 

University of Portland

5000 N. Willamette Blvd.

Portland, Oregon 97203

 

T: 503.943.7141  E: [log in to unmask]

www.up.edu/learningcommons

 

Follow the Learning Commons on Facebook

 

From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Saundra McGuire
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 8:44 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Electronic Textbooks

 

This a major problem that has significant negative impacts on learning.  In fact, there is research that indicates that the brain prefers paper.  See https://twosidesus.wordpress.com/2013/12/02/scientific-american-why-the-brain-prefers-paper/.  At one school I visited a publisher was going to make e-copies of books available to students at a significantly reduced price, but the student government association conveyed the wishes of the students to have print books, even if they had to pay more.  So students really do understand that print books work better for them.

 

But because print books are rapidly disappearing, we’ll have to help students effectively use e-books, beginning with helping them accept that they CAN use them effectively.  If they approach the e-books with a negative attitude, it only makes matters worse. 

 

I found a few good articles when I googled “how to make the best use of e-books”.  I think one of the most useful features of e-books is the interactive features.  Students are usually unaware of the practice quizzes, study guides, etc. that are available with e books, and if we show them how to use that feature they seem pleased.  One of the articles even talked about using an e-book as a good study partner.  So I think there are ways we can help students see how to use e-books to their benefit even though I don’t think they’re the best way for students to learn.

 

Happy Mardi Gras Week!
Saundra

 

Saundra McGuire, Ph.D. 

Director Emerita, Center for Academic Success

(Ret) Assistant Vice Chancellor  & Professor of Chemistry

Louisiana State University

Online Course on Teach Students How to Learn (https://tinyurl.com/TSLcourse)

Teach Yourself How to Learn (Info at http://tinyurl.com/y9aqwhhx)

Teach Students How to Learn (Info at http://tinyurl.com/ogfktwp)

 

From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Askey, Kelly L.
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 10:31 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Electronic Textbooks

 

Hi Everyone,

 

I provide academic skills presentations on campus, and I have been asked about doing a presentation about using e-textbooks. Several students brought up their struggles with having texts that are e-books at the last presentation I gave, so I would very much like to make it happen. I’d really like to know if anyone has done this, and if so, could you share? I would appreciate it!

 

Kelly Askey lodes  |  Peer/Group Tutoring & Student Success Supervisor

 

Academic Support Center at Florissant Valley | IR-113

3400 Pershall Rd.| St. Louis, MO 63135  |voice 314.513.4073 | email [log in to unmask]

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