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Sure thing. I have a lot more reflection activities up my sleeve if you
want more!

On Wed, Feb 26, 2020 at 12:50 PM Marti Alger <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Thank you for this closing reflection. I will use it Rebecca. J
>
>
>
> *From:* Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals [mailto:
> [log in to unmask]] *On Behalf Of *Rebecca Tedesco
> *Sent:* Friday, February 21, 2020 3:03 PM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* Re: Training on tutoring and mindfulness
>
>
>
> *CAUTION External Sender:* Do not click links or open attachments unless
> you recognize the sender and know the content is safe.
>
>
>
> Ray, I doubt you'd take issue with any of the 'mindfulness' activities I
> do with my tutors, because they fall under the larger umbrella of
> reflective practice, which is a core tenet of educational theory.  Here are
> some examples:
>
>    - *At the first tutor meeting of the year, I have the tutors do a
>    short exercise. * I give them a slip of paper and ask them to write on
>    it something that was on their minds when they came into the meeting.
>    Then, I ask them to crumple or fold it up and put it in their pocket.  I
>    tell them that it will still be there when they leave the meeting; but, our
>    tutor meetings are a space for them to take a break from whatever is
>    weighing on their minds in the outside world and to be here, with their
>    fellow tutors and me, and soak up the experience of getting to be a tutor,
>    because it will be over before they know it.  The tutors love this.  They
>    have told me they look forward to the first meeting of the year to get this
>    reminder.
>
>
>    - *Weekly staff meetings always include at least 20 minutes for tutors
>    to talk to each other about what is happening in their sessions.*
>    During this time, tutors celebrate successes and solicit advice from each
>    other.  The idea is that they get into the habit of reflecting on what they
>    did in session and what really worked or what they could have done
>    differently, etc.  And they see that even experienced tutors need advice
>    sometimes and that is a good thing.
>
>
>    - *I always begin CRLA Level 1 and 2 training sessions and tutor leads
>    meetings with a check-in activity.  *These activities are designed to
>    get tutors in the habit of taking stock of how they are feeling in a given
>    moment, so they can be present for the work we are about to do.  For
>    example, I spread postcards on the table or around the room and ask the
>    tutors to choose one that reflects how they are feeling *right now*.
>    I tell them they can choose to share or not.  Or, we do a One Word Whip,
>    where they choose a word that describes how they are feeling right now.
>    They can choose to explain or not after everyone has shared, and they
>    cannot repeat someone else's word.  The tutors have told me they look
>    forward to this exercise and they sometimes get very creative with
>    synonyms, which is fun!
>
>
>    - *In CRLA Level 1 training, we periodically do "highlights", where we
>    rewind through their week, day by day, and one person from the group has to
>    come up with a highlight from that day.*  I tell them that I do this
>    because it is human nature to fixate on the bad stuff that happens in our
>    lives and I want them to get into the habit of holding onto the good stuff
>    as well.  (I knew it was working when, one day, I came into training and
>    one of the tutors asked me if we were going to do highlights, because they
>    had "a really good one!"  I hadn't been planning to do it that day, but,
>    naturally, I changed my plan when I heard that!)
>
>
>    - *All of my tutor training sessions end with a reflection in which
>    they think about what they have learned and how they might add it to their
>    tutoring practice.*  I have attached a lesson plan for one of my
>    favorite reflective activities.
>
>
>
> Rebecca Tedesco
> Southwestern College
> CRLA Level 3 Master Tutor
> Certified Learning Center Professional - Level 2
> She/Her
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 19, 2020 at 11:10 PM Ray Sanchez <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> Nic,
>
> In fact I do know about mindfulness well enough and my statements stand. I
> only said that I did not read that particular article. No caricature was
> intended but a little humor, perhaps. Do I want my tutors to be present and
> responding to the person and situation in front of them? Indeed! But I
> won’t be using “mindfulness” to try and accomplish this.
>
>
>
> I really do want to fill the minds of my tutors with knowledge and skills
> so that they can, in turn, learn how to fill the minds of their tutees.
> Think of the phrase, *pouring into someone’s life*. This is what I want
> my peer tutors to do. This doesn’t mean they pour their knowledge of Human
> Biology into the mind of their tutees by means of a one-way, Human Biology
> funnel. In fact, I’m speaking less about content (the what) and more about
> learning strategies and academic virtues (the how). Tutors ought to
> personalize instruction and provide a student perspective, and this is
> largely about equipping their tutees with the skills and strategies to be a
> successful student in general and successful in the particular discipline
> of Human Biology.
>
>
>
> I do agree, however, that tutoring involves, “deep listening and
> observation, purposeful interpretation of students’ actions and statements,
> and strategic response in the form or questions, prompts, and silence.” I
> don’t believe I need to train my tutors in the principles and practices of
> mindfulness to get them there. You state:
>
> *That they are particularly popular now (and thus a bit of a fad) in the
> US  and in colleges says to me that we as a society need strategies for
> directing our minds, for being present with our (often difficult) emotions
> and in our exhausted bodies—that the strategies we currently have are not
> sufficient. (It’s not difficult to see why we are in this predicament, in
> my view.)*
>
> …and I agree whole heartedly (or whole mindedly!). The author of the
> article states that one benefit of training tutors in mindfulness
> techniques is to, *[reduce the] mental noise and [improve the] ability to
> self-regulate attention, a tutor can remain focused on the collaboratively
> established goals of the writing center session*. This is just not
> something I see as a priority and where there has been focus issues on the
> part of tutors I address it in other ways. I’m agreeing with you, please
> understand, on the matter of the tutors, tutees, me, and just about every
> person in 2020 America: we are all oversaturated in screens, frazzled at
> times with the pace of things, and enduring non-stop information overload.
> I just won’t use meditation in my tutor training to address these things.
>
> I like your: “students some of the time, people all of the time.” An
> example of how I mold my Centers in the direction of this axiom is to allow
> tutees (and sometimes tutors) to bring their children into sessions.
>
> Best,
>
> ~Ray
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <
> [log in to unmask]> *On Behalf Of *Nic Voge
> *Sent:* Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:12 AM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* Re: Training on tutoring and mindfulness
>
>
>
> Hello Ray,
>
> I encourage you to learn more about mindfulness and meditation before you
> make statements about what they are, and how they can shape experience and
> performance in any realm, including tutoring. Simplistic caricatures of
> “full” and “empty” in a material, literal sense are not helpful in
> understanding the psychological processes that these ancient and widespread
> practices entail. There are many well-researched books and empirical
> research articles and a vast literature about the practice of meditation
> and mindfulness you can look into.
>
>
>
> More specifically, you might think of “mindful”, for instance, as
> “present”. Do you want your tutors to be present, responding to the person
> and situation in front of them? This takes both a kind of preparation and
> practice for which mindfulness and meditation are well-suited. There are
> many, many approaches (strategies?) to meditation even in the Buddhist
> tradition—Zen is but one. You might think of meditation as intentional
> practice of directed attention with the aim of gaining insight both about
> oneself and how the mind works. Most start—in their Western adaptations—by
> asserting, actually,  that the aim is NOT to stop thinking or to
> intentionally empty the mind. There are direct analogues in this kind of
> practice to the notion and practice of metacognition, so crucial to the
> autonomous, self-regulated, adaptive learning required in college.
>
>
>
> It seems that your stated objection to mindfulness is that you want to put
> things in your tutors minds so that tutors can, as you put it, ‘fill the
> minds of their tutees.” I was struck by how this description differs from
> your other posts to the listserve about tutoring and learning. That is a
> view of tutoring and tutor training as “banking” I do not share and which I
> do not think is widespread in the field. Perhaps that is why others see the
> value of mindfulness for tutors and you do not—there are different models
> of tutoring underlying this discussion. But, if for you as it does for me,
> tutoring involves deep listening and observation, purposeful interpretation
> of students’ actions and statements, and strategic response in the form or
> questions, prompts, and silence, then mindfulness training can enhance
> these ‘skills’ in my experience. Why is not to say that it is the only way
> to do so or that any training focused on mindfulness will transfer to
> tutoring. I think we all know learning is not so simple.
>
>
>
> I do take your point that mindfulness can seem—and probably is in some
> cases—faddish. But, I don’t know how you would know that in this article we
> are getting a faddish treatment without having read it. Mindfulness and
> meditation have eon-long histories in many traditions (including Western,
> Christian, etc.) of usefulness for personal and mental transformation. That
> they are particularly popular now (and thus a bit of a fad) in the US  and
> in colleges says to me that we as a society need strategies for directing
> our minds, for being present with our (often difficult) emotions and in our
> exhausted bodies—that the strategies we currently have are not sufficient.
> (It’s not difficult to see why we are in this predicament, in my view.)
> Getting to a state of present mindfulness and engagement is crucial to deep
> learning of difficult content and skills that often evoke confusion,
> frustration and other emotional and cognitive responses that hinder
> immersion and learning.  If the students (and tutors) on your campus are
> not challenged by these issues, in a society where our attention is bought
> and sold and stressors on our bodies and (especially) minds are great, then
> I can assure they are ubiquitous elsewhere. Attention, concentration,
> purposefulness in the face of distraction, divided attention, relentless
> stimulation and input are huge issues in the learning of the students I
> work with—and more than ever. Research on engagement and the new field of
> “academic emotions” might be interesting to look at.
>
>
>
> Students—and tutors—are human beings. Meditation and mindfulness are
> unique skills for being human, for living a meaningful, purposeful life
> each and every moment--much like music, art, conversation, breathing, and
> prayer. I like to point out that in our Center we recognize that students
> are “students some of the time, and people all of the time.” We explicitly
> strive for academic and holistic thriving for our students and staff. In my
> view, quite often students are not experiencing their colleges as
> humanizing, actualizing places; they are not finding time and ways in this
> crucial developmental period to acquire the ‘skills, strategies, and
> mindsets’ for living well (i.e. ‘wellbeing’), any more than they are
> acquiring the  ‘skills, strategies, and mindsets’ in their courses for
> effective life-long learning—as we know as learning support professionals.
>
>
>
> I, for one, am open to new ways of doing our work and meeting the needs of
> the students in our institutions and Centers while simultaneously fiercely
> defending our unique community and body of knowledge. Disciplines
> frequently grow by engagement with other disciplines. I also think that we,
> ourselves, have a “discipline” of our own as learning professionals that
> has great power (and is often under-appreciated) and that we should
> interpret, select and adapt what other disciplines have to offer us, not
> simply  uncritically incorporate the tools and theories of other
> disciplines. This brings to mind a quote (by Amos Bronson Alcott) my
> former professor P David Pearson shared recently, “The true teacher
> defends his pupils against his own personal influence. He inspires
> self-trust. He guides their eyes from himself to the spirit that quickens
> him. He will have no disciples.” This is what I aspire to. No disciples, no
> gurus.
>
>
>
> Best,
>
> Nic
>
>
>
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
>
> Dominic (Nic) J. Voge  || Senior Associate Director || he, him, his
>
> *McGraw Center for Teaching & Learning* ||  Princeton University
>
> 328 Frist Center
>
> (609)258-6921  || https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__mcgraw.princeton.edu_undergraduates&d=DwIFaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=tkAACBgX69zH9b8QGasKbhgWu8w0Arh-QhL0xf_Y95k&m=WBsrrx6Qo4rCzBEu64dDC5aRAVjIDAjVlp1XhtxCud0&s=uQPyybagfKzHk8FuoEtliocD-mpi3x7t7HQtptxQAJ8&e= 
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__mcgraw.princeton.edu_undergraduates&d=DwMGaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=tkAACBgX69zH9b8QGasKbhgWu8w0Arh-QhL0xf_Y95k&m=7xNvg_G_XT_ltrBZDSfsvYZoNxdpZt9WfvkELVDyAdc&s=BIdW3OHJw59ZuGZuCvmW_0a1wZwBtHyjLfXX8VTb_vw&e=>
>
> [image: signature_359947443]
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>
>
>
> *Life Beyond Grades: Designing College Courses to Promote Intrinsic
> Motivation
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.cambridge.org_us_academic_subjects_psychology_psychology-2Dgeneral-2Dinterest_life-2Dbeyond-2Dgrades-2Ddesigning-2Dcollege-2Dcourses-2Dpromote-2Dintrinsic-2Dmotivation-3Fformat-3DPB-26isbn-3D9780521805230&d=DwMGaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=tkAACBgX69zH9b8QGasKbhgWu8w0Arh-QhL0xf_Y95k&m=7xNvg_G_XT_ltrBZDSfsvYZoNxdpZt9WfvkELVDyAdc&s=h8nVjPleREPUUmVdaJuO2BgOWhN37ibPJoMULhPd_pc&e=>*
>
> The Key To Overcoming Procrastination | TEDx PrincetonU
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>
> [image: Principedia]
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>
> *The Insiders’ Guide To Princeton Academics—Add Your Voice!*
>
>
>
> "A university is, according to the usual designation, an alma mater,
> knowing her children one by one, not a foundry, or a mint, or a
> treadmill."--John Henry Newman
>
>
>
>
>
> *From: *Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <
> [log in to unmask]> on behalf of Ray Sanchez <[log in to unmask]>
> *Reply-To: *Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <
> [log in to unmask]>
> *Date: *Wednesday, February 19, 2020 at 2:39 AM
> *To: *"[log in to unmask]" <[log in to unmask]>
> *Subject: *Re: Training on tutoring and mindfulness
>
>
>
> I’m no fan of mindfulness in tutor training. I haven’t read this article,
> but I do know that mindfulness is rooted in Zen Buddhist tradition and
> methods (meditation!) and I prefer to have my tutors fill their minds with
> something specific, rather than clear or empty their minds—which could lead
> to a filling of their mind with things I don’t want there!
>
>
>
> You know, like when people say, “Have an open mind,” and I say, “No
> thanks, I want to keep a colander on my brain to filter out the garbage.”
> Okay, I know, perhaps I’m being a little too critical or literal. Relaxing
> and breathing can definitely help us all slow down and reflect and it is
> proven to ease stress and is a counter to self-flagellation. That’s good.
> But I really don’t need my tutors to have fullness of mind, but fullness of
> solutions and strategies to fill the minds of their tutees.
>
>
>
> ~Ray
>
>
>
> *From:* Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <
> [log in to unmask]> *On Behalf Of *Mabrey, Paul - mabreype
> *Sent:* Tuesday, February 18, 2020 9:39 AM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* Re: Training on tutoring and mindfulness
>
>
>
> Dear Ira and others,
>
>
>
> Jared Featherstone is a colleague here in the James Madison University
> Learning Centers that specializes on researching and integrating
> mindfulness into learning, tutor training, tutoring, and life. Below is an
> article on this, with resources linked, from WLN A Journal of Writing
> Center Scholarship. He has also presented on this across conferences and
> keynote addresses. I have copied him here if you would like to connect.
>
>
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__wlnjournal.org_digitaleditedcollection1_Featherstoneetal.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=tkAACBgX69zH9b8QGasKbhgWu8w0Arh-QhL0xf_Y95k&m=WBsrrx6Qo4rCzBEu64dDC5aRAVjIDAjVlp1XhtxCud0&s=YdVx7RD34-JMCThY1rGssJFYgA38l_Uq5Ny9lFmDfTE&e= 
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__wlnjournal.org_digitaleditedcollection1_Featherstoneetal.html&d=DwMGaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=tkAACBgX69zH9b8QGasKbhgWu8w0Arh-QhL0xf_Y95k&m=EJRR0Ku-rUFC1T1EObV6syf1JWxFvl_Uy67lQ1bwuWI&s=EzuVtbCtqxUbAHTs7HrsMY6jBu2tNjw_d0QkljmmB3A&e=>
>
>
>
> Paul
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Paul E. Mabrey III, Ph.D. (he/him/his)
>
> Communication Center Coordinator
>
> Assistant Professor, School of Communication Studies
>
> Co-Editor, *Communication Center Journal*
>
> James Madison University
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From: *Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <
> [log in to unmask]> on behalf of "Fenton,Jennifer" <
> [log in to unmask]>
> *Reply-To: *Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <
> [log in to unmask]>
> *Date: *Tuesday, February 18, 2020 at 11:32 AM
> *To: *"[log in to unmask]" <[log in to unmask]>
> *Subject: *Re: Training on tutoring and mindfulness
>
>
>
> We have used the article "The Mistake I Made with My Grieving Friend" by
> Celeste Headlee and discussed the idea of shift vs. support focus in that
> article to show tutors how to frame more mindful conversations.
>
>
>
> Our Level 3 tutors have also expanded presentations on self-regulation
> theory using metacognitive work by Leonard Geddes and Saundra McGuire. We
> also dabble in Brave Space Theory in order to cover topics related to
> diversity awareness, too. I have some of their presentations on file as
> well if you'd like them.
>
>
>
> We emphasize the concept that how you regulate your own emotions as a
> tutor affects your tutoring strategies as well as choices. Yet, from the
> student angle, we highlight the idea that there is no way to know the depth
> of feelings and struggles of the person in front you, so the best response
> is the most compassionate one.
>
>
>
> Hope this helps.
>
>
>
> Sincerely,
>
>
>
> *Jennifer Fenton *
>
> *She/Her/Hers*
>
> Learning Specialist - Writing & Adjunct Professor
>
> MCC-Longview
>
> Office: 816-604-2208 at LR 220
>
> 500 SW Longview Road,
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_search_500-2BSW-2BLongview-2BRoad-2C-2BLee-27s-2BSummit-2C-2BMO-2B64081-3Fentry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIFaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=tkAACBgX69zH9b8QGasKbhgWu8w0Arh-QhL0xf_Y95k&m=WBsrrx6Qo4rCzBEu64dDC5aRAVjIDAjVlp1XhtxCud0&s=U8XZLllflEXnMKHb99LMLij0jmlVkDz-by8GP37vmqw&e= >
>  Lee's Summit, MO 64081
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> -2105
>
> [log in to unmask] | https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.mcckc.edu&d=DwIFaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=tkAACBgX69zH9b8QGasKbhgWu8w0Arh-QhL0xf_Y95k&m=WBsrrx6Qo4rCzBEu64dDC5aRAVjIDAjVlp1XhtxCud0&s=p7GqNGBWGkRxYVu6E2oMA6FRDdP4Q8sgCVYlgoib3cM&e= 
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>
>
>
> *Preparing Students, Serving Communities, Creating Opportunities*
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <
> [log in to unmask]> on behalf of Ira Fabri <[log in to unmask]>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, February 18, 2020 10:24 AM
> *To:* [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
> *Subject:* Training on tutoring and mindfulness
>
>
>
> Hello, All.
>
>
>
> I hope you All are having a great week.
>
>
>
> I am preparing a training session for my CRLA Level 2 tutors on
> mindfulness and tutoring.
>
>
>
> Does anybody have materials to recommend or share?
>
>
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
>
>
> Ira
>
>
>
> --
>
> Ira Fabri
>
> *Pronouns: She, Her, Hers*
>
> Associate Director, Tutoring Services
>
> Academic Success Center
>
> Division of Undergraduate Academic Affairs (UAA)
>
> UMBC
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_search_1000-2BHilltop-2BCircle-2B-250D-250A-2B-250D-250A-2B-250D-250A-2BBaltimore-2C-2BMD-2B21250-3Fentry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIFaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=tkAACBgX69zH9b8QGasKbhgWu8w0Arh-QhL0xf_Y95k&m=WBsrrx6Qo4rCzBEu64dDC5aRAVjIDAjVlp1XhtxCud0&s=ganptmFw2ourmmn8vLtJDkw1TfA7RhMR4Mfe8HH0k2s&e= >
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_search_1000-2BHilltop-2BCircle-2B-250D-250A-2B-250D-250A-2B-250D-250A-2BBaltimore-2C-2BMD-2B21250-3Fentry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIFaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=tkAACBgX69zH9b8QGasKbhgWu8w0Arh-QhL0xf_Y95k&m=WBsrrx6Qo4rCzBEu64dDC5aRAVjIDAjVlp1XhtxCud0&s=ganptmFw2ourmmn8vLtJDkw1TfA7RhMR4Mfe8HH0k2s&e= >
>
> Sherman Hall East, 342
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_search_1000-2BHilltop-2BCircle-2B-250D-250A-2B-250D-250A-2B-250D-250A-2BBaltimore-2C-2BMD-2B21250-3Fentry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIFaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=tkAACBgX69zH9b8QGasKbhgWu8w0Arh-QhL0xf_Y95k&m=WBsrrx6Qo4rCzBEu64dDC5aRAVjIDAjVlp1XhtxCud0&s=ganptmFw2ourmmn8vLtJDkw1TfA7RhMR4Mfe8HH0k2s&e= >
>
> 1000 Hilltop Circle
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_search_1000-2BHilltop-2BCircle-2B-250D-250A-2B-250D-250A-2B-250D-250A-2BBaltimore-2C-2BMD-2B21250-3Fentry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIFaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=tkAACBgX69zH9b8QGasKbhgWu8w0Arh-QhL0xf_Y95k&m=WBsrrx6Qo4rCzBEu64dDC5aRAVjIDAjVlp1XhtxCud0&s=ganptmFw2ourmmn8vLtJDkw1TfA7RhMR4Mfe8HH0k2s&e= >
>
> Baltimore, MD 21250
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps_search_1000-2BHilltop-2BCircle-2B-250D-250A-2B-250D-250A-2B-250D-250A-2BBaltimore-2C-2BMD-2B21250-3Fentry-3Dgmail-26source-3Dg&d=DwIFaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=tkAACBgX69zH9b8QGasKbhgWu8w0Arh-QhL0xf_Y95k&m=WBsrrx6Qo4rCzBEu64dDC5aRAVjIDAjVlp1XhtxCud0&s=ganptmFw2ourmmn8vLtJDkw1TfA7RhMR4Mfe8HH0k2s&e= >
>
>
>
> 410-455-3905
>
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-- 
Rebecca Tedesco
Southwestern College
CRLA Level 3 Master Tutor
Certified Learning Center Professional - Level 2
She/Her

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Contact the owner of the listserv regarding questions:  Rob Bailey ([log in to unmask])