On Fri, Feb 7, 2020 at 6:52 PM Nic Voge <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

 

Hi All,

I frame this topic as notemaking/getting the most from class as a way to try to interrupt the assumption that notetaking is largely a matter of writing down what professors say. I also strive for making these sessions interactive, but have found it difficult to model an authentic class lecture  in which students would have had a reading assignment, be expected to draw upon previous course material, and be anticipating papers, projects, exams etc. that make notemaking so cognitively demanding. So, instead, I’ve come to emphasize strategizing, more than specific techniques, for what I call “notemaking”. Notemaking includes noting one’s own thoughts and insights, (re-)organizing content, and adding to notes in later stages of study—taking is only part of the process. I also address ways to USE notes for various kinds of tasks—which I think is equally as important as taking effective notes. I’ve attached a handout that conveys my approach.

 

One way to get students to actively strategize is to ask them to think about what they will DO with their notes and when, and what features the notes must have in order to use them for these purposes.  That, then, is their target—the outcome criteria for their notes. Then, I ask them to think systematically and comprehensively about all the possible things they could do BEFORE lecture to help them create the kinds of notes they want. I ask them to brainstorm what they can do DURING lecture/while making notes, and what they can do AFTER class to maximize their benefit, enhance and prep their notes for their later use for studying, writing papers, solving problems, etc. The idea is that students can choose from these lists depending upon the course, the week or topic or any number of factors that might point to a different approach to notemaking. You can find a basic handout attached.

 

Best,

Nic




 

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From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Michael Kassel <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Friday, February 7, 2020 at 4:24 PM
To: "[log in to unmask]" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Notetaking Workshop Ideas

 

I've done these workshops for quite some time.  I talk about the ideas of taking notes and the importance of re-copying and condensing.  As a historian, I use a segment of one of my lectures - literally a paragraph of text -- and deliver it as I would in a class.  The lecture paragraph is shown on a powerpoint slide (they don't need to write it down, although they can).  I use a very obscure topic (Spinning Bees from colonial America) and then I show them a slide of how I might condense those notes (taking out sentence structure, concentrating on main points/new terms).  I then show them another shorter version that we all go over.  I then take away the notes and quiz them and they are always able to respond to the questions.  

 

OK, in reality it's a bit of a parlour trick as dealing with the info that soon makes it pretty easy to keep it in mind - however, it demonstrates the process and I have yet to have a group I've done this with (been doing it probably 25 years) where they have not been impressed with/proud of their ability to recall.

 

Make it better/more meaningful by delivering the lecture and having them take notes.  Give them five minutes to condense it (after you describe what they should do), have them discuss what they came up with and then quiz.  But I've found, over the years, it seems to be just as effective skipping that hands on step. I have no data to say which is better, though, as I have never measured this - just my observations on 25 years of delivering this workshop.

 

Hope this helps.

Mike

 


Michael B. Kassel, Ph. D.

Tutorial Coordinator

Student Success Center

285 University Pavilion

(810) 766-6773

 

 

On Fri, Feb 7, 2020 at 3:52 PM Askey, Kelly L. <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

I am leading a notetaking workshop next week, and I’ve taught it many times before, but I am looking for some ideas to make it more interactive. If anyone has information they can share, things they’ve tried that worked well, etc., I would appreciate it!

 

Thanks,

 

Kelly Askey lodes  |  Peer/Group Tutoring & Student Success Supervisor

 

Academic Support Center at Florissant Valley | IR-113

3400 Pershall Rd.| St. Louis, MO 63135  |voice 314.513.4073 | email [log in to unmask]

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