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Correction: the limited free link for the SNR piece is:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tandfonline.com_eprint_VEEBBWY5SIIA6QPFPB67_full-3Ftarget-3D10.1080_08941920.2020.1783730&d=DwIDaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=yQQsvTNAnbvDXGM4nDrXAje4pr0qHX2qIOcCQtJ5k3w&m=ocdBrYinjHZyyWWT1v_SPM5rCpOzbB15RkH_cSqOlTg&s=psOg6FJZyJw1oRlJ62J137UJURPPAnMQVUD-LyHDPjA&e= 


On 7/2/2020 1:02 PM, David Tindall wrote:
>
> I have two co-authored pieces on social networks and the environment 
> that may be of interest to some members of the list. (Though they are 
> very different topics, and different types of analyses.)
>
>
> The first is in /Society and Natural Resources/:
>
> The citation and abstract is as follows:
>
> David B. Tindall, Mark C.J. Stoddart, Adam C. Howe. "Social Networks 
> and Climate Change Policy Preferences: Structural Location and Policy 
> Actor Support for Fossil Fuel Production." /Society and Natural Resources/
>
>
> Abstract: Contrary to what is needed for reducing global GHG 
> emissions, successive Canadian governments have placed fossil fuel 
> production at the core of national economic development. This presents 
> a puzzle: how should we understand contradictory political commitments 
> to the Paris agreement and low carbon energy futures, on one hand, and 
> the persistence of support for fossil fuel centered energy futures, on 
> the other hand. Using a policy network perspective, we ask: Is the 
> location of actors within a climate change policy network associated 
> with their position on curtailing the Alberta oil sands development? 
> Results show that actors’ social network positions are associated with 
> their support for curtailing oil sands development. This network 
> association persists even when the sectoral affiliation and climate 
> change beliefs of actors are statistically controlled. Our results 
> demonstrate that policy network analysis helps explain the persistence 
> of the contradictory politics of fossil fuel development and support 
> for decarbonization.
>
> The advance online version (which the journal has made open-access) is 
> now available at:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.tandfonline.com_doi_abs_10.1080_08941920.2020.1783730-3FjournalCode-3Dusnr20&d=DwIDaQ&c=sJ6xIWYx-zLMB3EPkvcnVg&r=yQQsvTNAnbvDXGM4nDrXAje4pr0qHX2qIOcCQtJ5k3w&m=ocdBrYinjHZyyWWT1v_SPM5rCpOzbB15RkH_cSqOlTg&s=1FQQoRztAMlN_tliLWLCTM9zwPTUPCh4boWu7n1wsg0&e= 
>
>
>
> The second in in /Sociological Perspectives/:
>
> The citation and abstract is as follows:
>
> David B. Tindall, Adam C. Howe, Céline Mauboulès. "Tangled Roots: 
> Personal Networks and the Participation of Individuals in an 
> Anti-environmentalism Countermovement." /Sociological Perspectives/
>
> Abstract: We focus on the personal networks of members of an 
> anti-environmentalism countermovement in a small town in Canada (Port 
> Alberni, B.C.) that mobilized against the environmental movement. 
> Drawing primarily from social survey data, we investigate the effects 
> of network-based mobilization processes, and contending-movement ties 
> (ties to the environmental movement), on level of participation in the 
> countermovement. We add to the literature on networks and social 
> movements, and movement-countermovement dynamics by 1) comparing 
> network processes amongst a counter movement with those amongst a 
> corresponding social movement, and 2) comparing personal network 
> structures and mobilization processes between countermovement members 
> and the general public. We find a similar pattern of network-based 
> micromobilization processes amongst movement and countermovement 
> participant networks. We find both similarities, and key differences 
> between the counter movement and the general public in terms of 
> activism and social network ties. Theoretical predictions have 
> suggested that individuals who have ties to opposing groups will 
> moderate their participation in a social movement. However, in this 
> study of a community countermovement organization in a small town in 
> Canada that mobilized against the provincial environmental movement we 
> find that the number of contending movement ties (the range of ties to 
> environmental organizations) held by individuals in the 
> countermovement has a significant positive association with 
> countermovement activism, and is the strongest statistical predictor 
> of countermovement activism. Drawing upon both theory and substantive 
> information we discuss the implications of this novel finding.
>
>
> I can e-mail the /Sociological Perspectives/ piece to anyone who is 
> interested. (I think it is behind a paywall.)
>
>
> DBT
>
>
>
> -- 
> David Tindall
> Professor
> Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia
>
> Chair
> Environment and Society Minor, Faculty of Arts, University of British Columbia
>
> Mailing address:
>
> Department of Sociology
> University of British Columbia
> 6303 N.W. Marine Drive
> Vancouver, British Columbia
> Canada V6T 1Z1
>
> Office Location: Anthropology and Sociology Building Room 1317
>
> E-mail:[log in to unmask]
>
>


-- 
David Tindall
Professor
Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia

Chair
Environment and Society Minor, Faculty of Arts, University of British Columbia

Mailing address:

Department of Sociology
University of British Columbia
6303 N.W. Marine Drive
Vancouver, British Columbia
Canada V6T 1Z1

Office Location: Anthropology and Sociology Building Room 1317

E-mail: [log in to unmask]


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