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Hi all,

Thank you for bringing this topic up Ira.  I appreciate it and it is something that I have challenges with when talking to faculty, students, and counselors.  I don't know if it is helpful but I attached some articles below (I don't know if it will attach these documents so I put the citation information below as well).  In my own data collection and analysis, it was difficult to find a strong correlation between students receiving tutoring and factors revolving around academic achievement, particularly GPA.  In fact, this was difficult to assess in that it was impossible to determine what students who received tutoring would have received in the course they received tutoring for without tutoring.  Moreover, it was hard to determine because it didn't include qualitative indicators, such as engagement, showing up on time and prepared, application of what is learned, rapport with tutor, etc.  One of the things I recently did was in Starfish, I added a SpeedNotes section that asks for qualitative factors in a checkbox form that tutors are required to fill out.  Questions include tutee's confidence level after leaving session, whether or not they showed up on time and prepared, whether or not the tutee put forward effort, etc.  While this isn't by any means scientific it provides myself and my staff a clearer picture as to how students are engaging in tutoring services.

I do agree that there needs to be more communication as to what tutors, particularly peer tutors, are capable of and what they aren't capable of doing.  Working with many administrators who see immediate tutoring as a fix-all for those students' academic difficulties, or others who gauge student success simply by the number of hours they receive tutoring is problematic.  Thank you again and I hope all is well.

Ryan

Sources Referenced:
Comfort, Paul and John James McMahon.  "The Effects of Peer Tutoring on Academic Achievement."  Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education 6, no. 1 (2012): 168-175.

Kostecki, James and Trudy Bers.  "The Effect of Tutoring on Student Success." Journal of Applied Research in the Community College 16, no. 1 (Fall 2008): 6-12.

Ticknor, Cindy, Shaw, Kimberly A., and Timothy Howard.  "Assessing the Impact of Tutorial Services."  Journal of College Reading and Learning 45 (2014): 52-66.



On Mon, Mar 29, 2021 at 11:11 AM Ira Fabri <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Thank you, All for your insight and information!

Ira

On Sun, Mar 28, 2021 at 4:26 PM Debbie Malewicki <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

Hi Rebecca,

 

I did some of the same correlations as Ira in years past, but obviously that data stayed behind when I left the institution through which I collected it.  I did see a spike for students in the middle, ballpark a session or so a week for a class spread throughout the term.  I didn’t notice a particularly strong finish, i.e., grades in the high B or A ranges, for students who “lived” in the tutoring center.  We looked at this data for some, not all, years intermittently, so these are casual impressions rather than anything I could quantify.

 

I wish I could quickly pull up the study I mentioned, but I’m inundated for the next few days at least and suspect it will take me at least an hour to find it.  I’ll see if I can locate it later this week and will post it here if I do.  I just remember that it came out of the CCC and was based upon a study with those correlations.  I don’t know that I would consider any outcome as a hard and fast rule because there are too many variables that go into a grade for a course, but that one struck home with me because it showed a range of concrete numbers and a realistic outcome I could use to drive home the “not miracle workers” attitude.

 

When I started using it, I cited the source in some of our marketing materials, but I left that school a few years ago and didn’t take that kind of content with me.  I’m sorry.

 

Sincerely,

 

Debbie Malewicki, President

USA Tutors, LLC

(203) 800-4100

[log in to unmask]

www.USATutors.io

 

 

From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Michael Kassel
Sent: Sunday, March 28, 2021 3:24 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Tutors as "miracle" workers

 

I’d like to see the study as well. I know it’s possible to get good data on SI but tutoring efficacy is so hard to measure. 



On Mar 28, 2021, at 2:55 PM, Rebecca Tedesco <[log in to unmask]> wrote:



Debbie: What is this magical study of which you speak? 🦄 Please share to the listserv!

 

Ira: Could you use your own assessment data on student learning outcomes over time, if you have data on that, to make this point? For example, if you collect data to show the correlation between grade outcomes for students who attend different numbers of tutoring sessions (e.g. students who attend 1 session vs. 2-3 sessions vs. 4-6 sessions vs. 7+ sessions). If you are not currently doing this, I highly recommend that you do so!

 

Rebecca Tedesco

Southwestern College (San Diego, CA)

CRLA Level 3 Master Tutor
Certified Learning Center Professional - Level 3

She/Her

 

 

On Sun, Mar 28, 2021 at 11:20 AM Debbie Malewicki <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

There is a study that I read several years ago, maybe six or seven, that came out of the California Community College system. It was research-based and demonstrated that the average number of tutoring session visits a student needed to make what they termed meaningful course progress was six with the first happening before mid term and the rest spaced out over the remainder of the semester. They defined meaningful course improvement as an average of one letter grade.

 

I picked up and ran with that information with many of the promotional pitches I did with both the students directly and with their parents during freshman orientation. I would even put spins on it with a smile explaining that the last five sessions weren’t going to do much if they all happened during finals week or the week leading up to it and that we are not miracle workers.

 

That example seems to give people a context for realistic expectations even if the same situation didn’t apply to them or their student. I would then emphasize the importance of being proactive and coming in on a weekly basis starting at the beginning of the semester for a class where you know you’re likely to struggle so that we can work with you on not falling behind.

 

I’m not sure if my response exactly answers your question or not, but hopefully it’s helpful.

 

Sincerely,

Debbie Malewicki, President

USA Tutors, LLC

(203) 800-4100

Facebook: @USATutors


From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Ira Fabri <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, March 28, 2021 12:55:45 PM
To: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Tutors as "miracle" workers

 

Hello, All.

 

More and more often, I receive requests to assign a tutor to a student with "severe" challenges, with the expectation that the students will as a result get straight As. We try to educate students and staff on what tutors can/can't do, through our website, flyers, emails, but it doesn't seem to make that much of a difference. 

If you have any tips or ideas on how to communicate better that peer tutors can help but are not miracle workers, I will greatly appreciate it.

 

Best,

 

Ira

 


 

--

Ira Fabri

Pronouns: She, Her, Hers

Associate Director, Tutoring Services

Academic Success Center

Division of Undergraduate Academic Affairs (UAA)

UMBC

Sherman Hall East, 342

1000 Hilltop Circle

Baltimore, MD 21250

 

410-455-3905

 

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--
Ira Fabri
Pronouns: She, Her, Hers
Associate Director, Tutoring Services
Academic Success Center
Division of Undergraduate Academic Affairs (UAA)
UMBC
Sherman Hall East, 342
1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250

410-455-3905


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--
Ryan Mead, Ph.D
Senior Coordinator, Academic Support Services and Summer Programming
Educational Opportunity Program, Binghamton University
Email: [log in to unmask]
Zoom ID: 607-777-6867
Office Location: UU 263G

"Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced."
- James Baldwin
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