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Heather do you measure the effectiveness in terms of previous grades in the course?  For example, a person getting a D may seem a failure unless it was in a class they failed twice before. 

On Mar 28, 2021, at 3:36 PM, Heather Jewart <[log in to unmask]> wrote:


We have collected information on this for several years.  We base it on the number of hours tutored per course.  There is indeed a point where the effectiveness of tutoring starts to diminish.  I do not have the data in front of me, but it almost always looks the same each semester.  The effectiveness trend rises until about 12 - 15 hours and then starts to decline.   Other factors obviously play a role in this but the fact that the numbers are similar every semester is interesting.  


Heather Jewart

Coordinator of Tutoring

Butler County Community College

(724) 287-8711 x8165

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From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Rebecca Tedesco <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, March 28, 2021 2:54 PM
To: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Tutors as "miracle" workers
 
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Debbie: What is this magical study of which you speak? 🦄 Please share to the listserv!

Ira: Could you use your own assessment data on student learning outcomes over time, if you have data on that, to make this point? For example, if you collect data to show the correlation between grade outcomes for students who attend different numbers of tutoring sessions (e.g. students who attend 1 session vs. 2-3 sessions vs. 4-6 sessions vs. 7+ sessions). If you are not currently doing this, I highly recommend that you do so!

Rebecca Tedesco
Southwestern College (San Diego, CA)
CRLA Level 3 Master Tutor
Certified Learning Center Professional - Level 3
She/Her


On Sun, Mar 28, 2021 at 11:20 AM Debbie Malewicki <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
There is a study that I read several years ago, maybe six or seven, that came out of the California Community College system. It was research-based and demonstrated that the average number of tutoring session visits a student needed to make what they termed meaningful course progress was six with the first happening before mid term and the rest spaced out over the remainder of the semester. They defined meaningful course improvement as an average of one letter grade.

I picked up and ran with that information with many of the promotional pitches I did with both the students directly and with their parents during freshman orientation. I would even put spins on it with a smile explaining that the last five sessions weren’t going to do much if they all happened during finals week or the week leading up to it and that we are not miracle workers.

That example seems to give people a context for realistic expectations even if the same situation didn’t apply to them or their student. I would then emphasize the importance of being proactive and coming in on a weekly basis starting at the beginning of the semester for a class where you know you’re likely to struggle so that we can work with you on not falling behind.

I’m not sure if my response exactly answers your question or not, but hopefully it’s helpful.

Sincerely,
Debbie Malewicki, President
USA Tutors, LLC
(203) 800-4100
Facebook: @USATutors

From: Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Ira Fabri <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, March 28, 2021 12:55:45 PM
To: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Tutors as "miracle" workers
 
Hello, All.

More and more often, I receive requests to assign a tutor to a student with "severe" challenges, with the expectation that the students will as a result get straight As. We try to educate students and staff on what tutors can/can't do, through our website, flyers, emails, but it doesn't seem to make that much of a difference. 
If you have any tips or ideas on how to communicate better that peer tutors can help but are not miracle workers, I will greatly appreciate it.

Best,

Ira



--
Ira Fabri
Pronouns: She, Her, Hers
Associate Director, Tutoring Services
Academic Success Center
Division of Undergraduate Academic Affairs (UAA)
UMBC
Sherman Hall East, 342
1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250

410-455-3905


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