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Rebecca,
 
    You are correct in your perception that what we as learning
strategies (or "study skills") instructors teach is different from
what is taught in most freshmen orientation or student success
courses.  In our "University Experience" course at USF, we formerly
used the Master Student book but have recently switched texts.  The
curriculum for this course includes a variety of topics not
traditionally included in learning strategies courses: money
management; avoiding roommate problems, getting involved in campus
organizations; avoiding STDs and maintaining student health;
choosing a career/major, etc. All of these are worthwhile topics.  My
concern is that some individuals consider the Master Student book
adequate for teaching college reading techniques (covered in one
chapter) and study strategies.  For a student who may just need some
"pointers", the book suffices.  However, for those students who
really have difficulty coping with college textbook assignments and
organizing their study approaches, the book does not go far enough.
    I think those of us who are aligned with the reading and study
skills area by training need to be a bit more assertive on our
campuses in disabusing colleagues of the notions that (1) anyone can
teach study skills and (2) it can be done in a course which also
teaches the broad curriculum taught in the "sucess" courses.
    Thanks for raising an issue that has concerned me for quite some
time.
 
    ClareClare Hite, Program Director
Reading & Learning Program
University of South Florida
SVC 2124, 4202 E. Fowler Ave.
Tampa, FL   33620
(813) 974-9269
e-mail: [log in to unmask]