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Hi, Sue!  Per your suggestion, I'm responding on LRNASST because I know
there are others on the LIST who will be able to give you good
information as well.
 
The program Bob Mittan refers to was sponsored by the College of Arts and
Sciences and has since been effectively disbanded due to budget cuts.
It was open only to Arts and Sciences students on probation.  The
original program was required of all students on probation.  Student's
continuation in the college for the subsequent semester was dependent
upon the student's semester GPA AND participation record in the program.
None of the other colleges on our campus had/have a similar program.
 
Actually, there were two variations of the program "The Academic Success
Series" (TASS -- and be sure to use the word THE in the title if you
decide to use this acronym).  When Bob and I worked with TASS, it
consisted of a series (6 - 8 weeks, as I recall) of required large group
presentations on a specific topic (e.g., Time Management, Exam Preparation, Goal Setting,
Academic Planning Requirements, etc. ) followed by small group
discussion led by A & S academic advisors.  Those small groups were the
critical element, in my opinion, because they provided students the
opportunity to talk about their issues and concerns with a trained staff
member and to provide a support network among the group members.
Students who stayed with the program moved off probation --and stayed off
-- very successfully.
 
A variation included offering a section of our 3-unit  "Investigating Learning
Strategies" specifically for students on probation.  It was required of
the most at-risk and open to other A&S students on probation.  It too, was
both popular and successful.  They used the Ellis book but were looking to
move to the Weinsheimer text when the funding for the section was cut.
 
Pitfalls:  1.  any time you require a student to do something because of
"less than stellar" performance you need to be prepared for the
possibilities associated with angry/passive-agressive/whining behaviors.
(you'll also get those students who are eternally greatful that someone
cared enough to help.)
 
2.  Make sure you have faculty support.  Students often listen more
carefully if their faculty actively  support this type of program.
 
Hope this helps.
 
:) sylvia mioduski
university learning center
u of arizona
 
 
 
 
On Fri, 14 Apr 1995 [log in to unmask] wrote:
 
> Sylvia:
>         At Bob Mittan's suggestion, I'm contacting you to find out about
> the UA program for students on academic probation. As our community college
> moves toward an organized intervention process to help such students
> redirect their lives, we're searching for successful working models. Please
> send me any information that you think might help us head in the right
> direction. Specifically, how is your program organized? How are students
> directed into it? Are they required to participate? If not, what
> inducements are offered? What is the content of the program? What pitfalls
> should we be aware of?
>         Thanks in advance for your assistance. Feel free to post the
> information on LRNASST or to send it directly to me.
>
> Sue Wickham
> Academic Achievement Center
> Des Moines Area Community College
> 2006 S. Ankeny Boulevard
> Ankeny, IA  50021
>
> (515)965-7000
>
> e-mail: [log in to unmask]
>
>
>