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Martin,
 
I support your notions of the potential of the Internet.  I, too, have been
championing the availability of information in a variety of media for those of
us converting this information into knowledge.  I have graduate, undergraduate,
and yes even developmental students get access, seek out information, share
what they find with each other and with me, and document what they are
learning through hypermedia.   Now, all three of these student types are
teaching me new knowledge as we grow together.  Being the proverbial
constructivist educator, I am willing and even encouraging to this to
occur.  Perhaps as a field we need to reconsider our role in preparing our
charges for the rigors of success in an information based economy.  Those
who will be successful will be those who can seek out information in
whichever form is compatible (and even incompatible) to that phenomenon called
learning styles, organize that information into structured knowledge useful for
solving immediate and long term issues, and present that new found knowledge in
a format compatible with other's learning styles.  In a word, those who will be
successful are those who can read, write, and compute.  Less than a 100 years
ago, educators were highly respected and rewarded in our society.  Within the
next 100 years we will again be respected and rewarded, for we hold the key to
those skills and abilities.
 
Preparing students for that future, learning along with them, and sharing what
we learn through forums such as this must be our mission.  I am excited by the
challenge.
 
David C. Caverly, Ph.D.
Professor, Dept. of Curr. and Instruction
Southwest Texas State University
San Marcos, TX  78666-4616
(512) 245-3100
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