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Wouldn't "students as clients" be more apt? Firms are not interested in
bettering their customers; they are only interested in maximizing the
amount of money they can get from them by treating them well and catering
to their desires--not their needs.
 
On the other hand, clients (of a law firm, for example), expect the firm to
deliver expertise that the client lacks, and they are more apt to judge
the firm's success by the ultimate effect of the advice rather on how
good the advice made them feel initially.
 
John Flanigan
 
On Wed, 3 May 1995, Guillermo Uribe wrote:
 
> I want to respnd to the idea of students as customers.  One
> of the reasons firms are so interested in their customers is
> that in addition to customers providing revenue customers
> also provide information about changing preferences and
> changing markets.  Thus, it is important to have focus
> groups to determine where markets are and where they are
> going.  Students, likewise, are much closer market dynamism
> than professors and educational institutions, because
> students are insulated from social change by already having
> a salary and career.  Educational institutions stand to
> learn a lot from students if students are incorporated in
> some democratic process for setting educational policy.
> Students, for example, are the driving force, the reality so
> to speak, of multiculturalism and signalled for years this
> became a matter of public debate the changing demographics
> of the country.  In addition, the anxiety and new employment
> contracts produced by economic restructuring of the 1980s
> and by the 1990-91 recession has more immediacy for students
> than for those with jobs. Students are quite sensitive to
> these changes and are therefore probably best source of
> information for new social realities.
>
>
> kim gillespie <[log in to unmask]>
> Program in Modern Thought and Literature
>