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>>I don't know about the rest of you, but I am finding the amount of mail
>>generated by LRNASST to be far too great.  I have it coming in to a Vax
>>account set up exclusively for LRNASST mail, and I come back to check it
>>periodically.  Every time I do, I find literally hundreds of messages
>>waiting for me.  I then delete everything which, based on the subject name,
>>is probably not of direct interest to me.  I hate doing that because I
>>know people don't always use the right memo to reply on the right topic,
>>and because an ongoing discussion that has strayed from the stated topic
>>could in fact be interesting.  But I CAN'T read them ALL!
>>
>>Isn't it time to divide this Listserver into interest areas, perhaps based
>>on the special interest groups that are common to both NADE and CRLA?
>>
>>- Jim Melko
>
>
>I agree with Jim, that there is a lot happening in LRNASST, and it can be
>at times be overwhelming.  I do, however,  enjoy the lively discussions we
>have, so I tend to focus on those posts.  I just zap the ones I'm not
>interested in.
>If we divide LRNASST into categories (assuming we can agree on the
>categories) such as  "general," "conferences," "digests/summaries," and
>"position announcements" I suspect that Guillermo would become a VERY busy
>fellow (as if he isn't now), because he'll have to do a lot more set up
>(initially), maintenance, and monitoring.
>
>My 11.4521 cents worth.
>Ed
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Here's an idea, although it means switching from a listserv to the web:  If
the Lrnasst home page expanded from listing archives to a discussion based
page, it could be set up categorically.  A sample of a page that does that
is the Shakespeare Web (it's cute...not too serious, but well organized).
 The URL is www. Shakespeare.com.

The one drawback to a web page discussion group, as I see it, is that you
have to do a bit more work to save/download information AND it is somewhat
cumbersome to write lengthy responses because (I think) there is poor
wraparound text capabilities/poor editing capabilities. But I thought I'd
throw the idea out for you all to chew on.

Sheryl Sawin, Ph.D.
Learning Skills Counselor
The Learning Resource Center
St. Joeseph's University, Philadelphia