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To add to our discussion of reading tests, especially Gary's and Lonna's
comments that reading tests measure some kind of reasoning rather than
actual reading of the passages and that you can answer the questions
without reading the passage first:

About 10 years ago some researchers proved that you can often answer
the questions without reading the passages *at all.*  They gave the
GRE questions to a group of students without the passages, and they
got an average of 50% correct, significantly higher than the guessing level
of 25% (one out of 4 multiple choice answers).  They raised some questions
about what the test really measures, since evidently the students could
"comprehend" much of the passages without ever having seen them.  Sorry
I don't remember the reference, but it was in one of the journals on
testing and measurement.  Of course it doesn't seem to have changed
anyone's practice.

To add to the mess:  Constance Weaver's _Reading Process and Practice_
cites references showing that students can often use knowledge of
grammatical structure and syntax to choose correct answers to
comprehension questions without understanding what they read.  They
demonstrated this by giving students passages with nonsense verbs
and nouns embedded among English articles and pronouns to simulate real
sentences.

Annette Gourgey
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