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Lonna Smith writes:
>I'm curious as to how instruction would be different for
>advanced ESL students than for monodialectical developmental students.

First, I should say that (in my experience) advanced ESL students have
better writing and critical thinking skills than developmental native
speakers--that's what makes them "advanced."  However, the answer to this
question depends on the institution more than on the student. Obviously,
large institution with many second language students have the luxury of
offering sections tailored to various desires and needs.  At small
institutions or at those with only a handful of second language students,
the options are not so rosy.  At least, that's my perception;  and as I
contemplate the problem, I find myself stymied by a lack of specifics.  So:
Does any other of the 732 list subscribers have thoughts/observations on
instructional differences and similarities at your institution?

One observation I will make:  I have always found that ALL ESL students are
keenly interested in cultural differences--strongly motivated to learn them
and eager to discuss them.  Conversely, virtually all of the native speaking
students at my institution are completely unaware of cultural difference,
not having traveled nor having known "foreigners." I dare say that a second
language student in a class of native English speakers would find him- or
herself frustrated by the native speakers' lack of awareness.

Jon Ausubel