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Jon Ausubel described three types of students in his recent post. He
used students who want help with verb tenses. The first, a native
speaker, uses verb tenses correctly but cannot name the tense of an
indicated verb and cannot form a verb from an indicated tense.  The 2nd,
is a non-native speaker who knows all the verb forms but cannot use them
correctly in "real" situations.  The 3rd is a native speaker but one who
does not use Standard English and cannot indicate verb tenses.  Jon
stated his belief that only student #2 was ESL, and I agree with him. I
also agree that student #3 will benefit from exposure to speakers and
writers of SWE.  However, I respectfully disagree with his statement
that ESL students should be isolated from native speakers.  Native
speakers, even those who do not speak "perfect" standard English can
give much to ESL students who need as much exposure to the rhythm and
sound of English as they can get. As shown in the example, the cognitive
knowledge of verb tenses is meaningless unless they can be used
correctly in real situations.  I teach in a program where we combine
students who are ESL, bi-dialectical, learning disabled, and just poor
test-takers (they didn't pass the English placement test).  I have never
had an ESL student adopt the language of the bidialectical student - at
least not for long, as they are continually advised to seek a variety of
language models.  Isolation however, just leads to fossilization.

BTW, I don't believe that student #1 needs any help.  If s/he speaks and
writes SWE, why is it necessary to be able to identify all the names of
tenses?  After all, the only reason to learn all the names is to be able
to discuss them.  Unless s/he is studying for a degree that requires
discussion of tenses, why is it so important to know them?  If it ain't
broken...

Lonna Smith