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Tom Ott writes that he thinks the  term  "culture suicide"  that Stephen
Brookfield uses is too harsh a term  to describbe first generation college
students' struggles  and highlights the negative side of  breaking away
from one's home without  acknowledging the positive benefits. 

That's why I suggested some autobiographies -  Mike Rose describes his
struggle from East LA poverty to a professorship at UCLA -  Rodriguez also
struggled  but some have accused him of abandoning his culture;  

The quandry of the first generation students  whose parents oppose and put
down going to college is different from those whose parents support
college.  - i.e., see Thornton, Y. S. & Coudert, J.  The Ditch Digger's
Daughters, Bruce Lane Press, 1994. . 
Thornton describes how her father, a ditch digger,  wanted his three girls
to be doctors and what he and his wife did to make that possible. 
All got to college and one became a doctor.  MM

Tom wrote:  
<Steven Brookfield's description, The Skillful Teacher (1990)Jossey- Bass
p. 153, of 1st generation college students ("culture suicide")described
by Martha Maxwell seems a bit grim and one dimensional. Certainly there
is a struggle to break free of previous cultural influences, I remember
my own quite vividly, and no doubt it is sometimes a violent struggle,
but so too is there an emerging into a new culture. The emphasis in much
that I read seems to be on the former, and it should not be discounted,
but why is so little written about what this student can emerge into? I
realize there are landmines all over this territory, but if education is
really transformative (and Developmental Education especially so) and we
believe that what we would have students transform into---independently
thinking contributing members of our society hopefully with sensibilities
positively refined---then perhaps we need to be more concretely and
positively assertive about the enriched lives our students are moving
toward.>