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When a list member wrote, in reply to an offer to FAX materials:
>me too, please, if you have enough copies.
I was suddenly reminded of my experience as a young mum when the baby
health care nurse commented that it was wonderful that I had enough milk to
breastfeed my 9 month old baby so frequently, thereby revealing that
despite all the lectures she must have had on the physiology of lactation
(explaining that more milk is produced in response to the stimulation of
suckling, so the more you feed the more you have), the model that she
still relied on (possibly with consequences in her work as a
nurse-educator) was that of the bottle - the more you take out, the less is
in there.  This relates to the phenomenographic theories about the
importance for teachers to recognise and correct conceptual errors before
new learning can be incorporated and applied. Because this is usually a
content expert's role, it may not be an issue for learning
assistants/advisers, but I'm wondering what people's experience is.  In the
above example (we all do it - this one just started me thinking) there was
a transfer of a paper-based way of thinking to an electronic medium where
copies are potentially infinite. Does it seem to you that student problems
often arise from the misapplication of models?  I'm particularly interested
in your perceptions of the way models derived from other systems interfere
with students learning to use IT, because it has implications for the way
we should teach, but I'm also interested in the way models affect other
methods of communication.


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Jan Robbins                      Phone {intl+61+6+ (02)} 6249 2972
Study Skills Centre                 Fax   {     "        " } 6249 3399
Registrar's Division                eMail  [log in to unmask]
The Australian National University
Canberra ACT 0200
AUSTRALIA
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