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we as educators can certainly do what we can to help our students in
any way possible. I had a student in another marketing class that
never came to class. I knew she was bright and knew that something
was wrong. I then find out that she came from a home in which
domestic violence was prevalent and I tried to reach to her, giving
her special accommodations and extra time to finish work and I also
referred her to the college  Dept of Psychological Services. I found
in this business, I have been not only a professor, but I have had to
be "counselor", "friend" and even "mommy" to some students. That is
that makes it all rewarding. Prof L



> In my years of working with underprepared, or at-risk type
> of students, instructors can be contributors to a student's
> withdrawal....we can't always be responsible for what turns
> them off, but we should be sensitive to the fact that some
> things we do will have a negative effect.
>
> Some of our students are on such wobbly ground emotionally
> about their fit in the university environment, the cultural
> differences they are encountering, the racism, and the huge
> family and emotional problems they may be facing on the
> homefront, that it takes just that one straw to break them.
>
>
> I remember one such student of mine that has made me work to
> set the tone with my own staff ever since.  THis student was
> really tentative about whether or not he was going to make
> it in school.  He was very bright, but had lots of other
> problems and self-esteem issues stacked against him.  I
> finally talked him into going up to the computer lab (which
> he was very intimidated by) about three weeks late in the
> semester.  The lab coordinator, who had a reputation for
> being a "tough love" kind of person, sarcastically chided
> him when he came in for not doing so sooner.  That was the
> last that any of us saw of him.
>
> Now, I'm not saying we could have saved him if she had been
> nicer, but I am saying that we all need to think about the
> negative things we put in front of students without meaning
> to.  Friendliness and a supportive may buy us enough time to
> start to reverse the damage these students bring with them
> initially and give them the boost they need to persevere.
>
Sue Lorraine Lavorata
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