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Gary Probst wrote:

I do not see colleges dropping remedial programs because remedial
programs are called "cash cows" by some administrators.  Remedial
courses taught by part time faculty are very profitable.  Where colleges
really make money is when they charge the students for 4 credit hours
but pay the faculty for teaching 3 credit hours.

An interesting study for someone to do is to determine how much profit
there is in remedial eduation for colleges!


Paul G. Ellis wrote:
>
> Martha Maxwell wrote, among other things,
>
> "The experts are taking a cold, hard look at developmental education - and
> recommending  that since  teaching remedial courses is more like teaching
> high school than teaching college courses, they can be outsourced to
> extension, private companies  and/ or computerized.  Flagship universities
> have turned over dev. courses to extension divisions or community colleges.
> Courses like ESL and beginning foreign language courses (those that have
> always been lowest on the academic totem pole) are being  outsourced  or
> taught by technology  Second tier universities are rapidly divesting
> themselves of their remedial programs."
>
> Martha, could you name the "experts" and some of the "second tier
> universities . . . rapidly divesting themselves of their remedial
> programs"? I would like to hear directly from those universities, if they
> have representatives on LRNASST.
>
> Paul Ellis, Director                            [log in to unmask]
> Learning Assistance Program - BP 230            TEL 606.572.5611
> Northern Kentucky University            FAX 606.572.5566
> Highland Heights, KY 41099