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Gary Probst wrote:
The students who do not try could have develop learned helplessness in
learning because of bad prior experiences for the past 12+ years.  We
need to study learned helplessness and how to help students overcome
it.  Being disruptive in class is normal for a person who is learned
helpless.


Sue Lorraine Lavorata wrote:
>
> But you are a success story because you did not abuse the system and
> you were motivated to learn. YOu wanted to learn and you did. You
> were only on welfare for 4 years and you are an inspiration to us
> all. However others are on it for careers and are not motivated
> shining starts like yourself. You are a shining minority. There are a
> sea of abusers out there that need to be in check.
>
> Congratulations on a job well done
>
> Prof L
>
> > I would have thought that NOTHING could get me to stop checking placement
> > scores for evening classes during the first week of school until I read Carla
> > Chapman's remarks.  I am a Dean at a community college.  I went through college
> > in Massachusetts on Welfare, a single mother of two children.  Thanks to the
> > Commonwealth of Massachusetts, I am not a drug dealer or an overage hooker,
> > but a working professional who pays more in taxes each year than I received in
> > aid for the entire four years I was on Welfare back in the 70s.
> >
> > Of the many astonishing claims that Ms. Chapman and others have made, I'll
> > concentrate on two:
> > "There is nothing more frustrating" than having students in your class who are
> > only in it for the money???  Let's think a minute.  Surely there are SOME
> > things more frustrating than this experience (which I have had, by the way):
> > for example, what about the frustration of being a student in a course where
> > the teacher despises you and feels you are incapable of learning??  What about
> > being accepted into a classroom in which you are invisible?
> >
> > The second statement that offended and shocked me is that a motivated student
> > will find a way to learn even without government programs.  I'd like to wave my
> > magic wand and have every person who's ever uttered this phrase do it herself.
> > Did you ever face a situation where you could only get jobs that paid less than
> > you needed to live?  I did and, although I am an able and resourceful person, I
> > could not manage college without help.  What we all need to acknowledge is
> > that programs like the one that got me through college no longer exist.
> > Welfare recipients now get job training, not education.  If that.
> >
> > Brothers and sisters, let's not become jerks just because higher education is
> > not shaped to change the world.  Higher ed is mostly designed to replicate the
> > class system that already exists.  But now this tool is ours--If we reshape it,
> >  we CAN help to change the world.  Students who walk into any classroom may
> > have problems and deficiencies
> > of various kinds, but nearly all of them also have at least a small glimmer of
> > hope--the hope that this
> > time, the teacher will see the value they bring with their person to this
> > classroom.  I'll just quote Mina Shaughnessey here: "always assume that there
> > is a silent student in the back of the romm greater of head and of heart than
> > you."
> >                                         Susan Andrien
> >
> Sue Lorraine Lavorata
> E-MAIL:  [log in to unmask]