Print

Print


From:
       [log in to unmask] (SMCharnas)

Sun 22:57


Jill,
>and do imaginary/realistic portraits of both people and people
>places in watercolor,etching, and other media.....

On another list, of feminist SF authors, we have been discussing all the
means we use to rest and unwind, many of which are visual or tactile --
pictures in one form or another, activities like knitting or
needlepoint.
I do needlepoint, myself (as well as reading mysteries, which I do not
write),
finding the tactile values of the yarn and the visual pleasures of the
range and combinations of colors both pleasing and deeply restful.  Now
that
I'm completing a large writing project, I'm thinking about throttling
back
on the writing a bit and returning to my original training in visual
arts,
which I have neglected for decades.

>I certainly wouldn't recognise it at the end from the original conception at
>the outset. In fact often, I wonder at who wrote the piece, who drew it, how
>did it come about?

The closest I have come to this degree of detachment from the final work
is,
I suppose, the few cases where a story or part of one "writes itself" in
the sense that I put it down and find that there is no need to edit,
trim,
shape, or in any way form the results -- they are as they are.  An
example
is a letter from one character to another that closes an old novel of
mine,
which simply laid itself down on the page and was not touched
thereafter;
and in the sense that it "came" from someone not-me (from an aged,
British
world-traveler modeled on a real one) and was addressed to someone else
not-me (an Hispano-American schoolgirl with crippling asthma), I could
as
well ask, "Who wrote the piece, how did it come about?"

Suzy Charnas