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> Gary Probst replied:
>
> What hurts the success rate at our community is that 20% of the students in
> remedial classes are special education graduates.  They are permitted to enter
> the college because they are learning disabled.  If trained special education
> teachers cannot teach these students to learn to add, subtract, multiply, and
> divide in 12 years, what can part-time instructors with a math degree do to
> teach these skills in one semester?
>
> The current trend in some places in developmental education is to admit anyone
> as a developmental student and be blamed for their lack of success.  What need
> to be done is define what is required to be successful in a college
> developmental program.
>
I agree with Gary to a point.  However, I have encountered students who
were graduates of special education who had simply been misdiagnosed.
However, that seems to occur more in the language arts (at least from my
experience).  Unfortunately, our institution has an open door policy and
also the philosophy that everyone has the right to fail.  Often these
folks are given false hopes, and simply set themselves up for failure.
If you have a limited number of lights to turn on, you cannot create more
outlets if the potential has already been reached.  How would others
define what is required to be successful in a college developmental
program?> > > >



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x Bev Krieger                     x
x Kwantlen University College     x
x ACP Department                  x
x Langley Campus                  x
x 12666-72 Avenue                 x
x Surrey, BC Canada V3W 2M8       x
x Email:  [log in to unmask]      x
x Phone: (604) 599-3336           x
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