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Good observation below, Gail; I echo your response regarding the public misperception of technical education. In addition to automotive technology, building construction is another program where students are referred who are "good
with their hands" but then must learn concepts in courses such as physics, architectural drafting, etc. and not just the-parts-of-a-hammer.

"Gail M. Platt, Ph.D." wrote:

> << ...Vocational training would be far more logical [for students who suffer with mental retardation]. >>
>
> Since you mention vocational training, I would like to get on my soap box about what a poor job we in comprehensive community colleges do in explaining to the public the meaning of college-level technical training and education.
>
> Our community college is comprehensive; we have programs in automotive
> service technology (not auto mechanics, as some believe).  Automotive
> service technology is not checking the oil level and tire pressure on a
> car.  Automotive service technology is, in part, "electrical systems,
> including meters, wiring, circuit diagrams, lighting circuits, analog
> instrumentation, diagnostics," etc.  Textbook readability is at the
> 15th-17th grade levels (using standard readability formulae).
> Cosmetology requires that students read on at least the ninth grade
> level and that they understand measurements, ratio and proportion, etc.
> The general public and many high school educators  (and, in fact, even
> some arts and science faculty at my own college) think that "anybody"
> can roll up hair and work on cars.
>
> Since automotive technicians today charge $45 - $65 an hour to work on a
> vehicle and my hairdresser drives a new Mercedes (the expensive sports
> model, not the "cheaper" ones), I think we in community colleges should
> do a better job of explaining what used to be called "vocational
> programs" and are now called "technical programs."
>
> In my part of the state of Texas, there are very few opportunities for
> training and/or employment for individuals with below normal IQ other
> than Goodwill Industries and some fast food establishments.  It is a
> significant problem.
>
> Gail Platt, Ph.D.
> South Plains College
> [log in to unmask]

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Gail A. Rowe, Coordinator
Learning Assistance Programs
Southern Maine Technical College
2 Fort Road
So. Portland, ME 04106
http://www.smtc.net [log in to unmask]
207-767-9536
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