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I disagree because I think learning disabled students can be successful with
appropriate support mechanisms in place.  The greater problem, I think, is with
students of  borderline intelligence.  Transitional planning, which is required by
law, often leads these students to consider careers requiring extensive college
education.  I have often been told that students have a right to fail, but how
does that help their self-esteem?   In addition, failure rates in developmental
classes may be higher because many of these students cannot be successful in the
most basic classes.

Maureen Connolly

Gary K. Probst wrote:

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> Gary Probst replied:
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> What hurts the success rate at our community is that 20% of the students in
> remedial classes are special education graduates.  They are permitted to enter
> the college because they are learning disabled.  If trained special education
> teachers cannot teach these students to learn to add, subtract, multiply, and
> divide in 12 years, what can part-time instructors with a math degree do to
> teach these skills in one semester?
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