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From:
         Michael Stephen Cord <[log in to unmask]>

12:25 AM
>From:
>         [log in to unmask] (Bill Benzon)
>
>5:14 PM
>
>
>>From:
>
>
>>
>>Please allow me to correct my own statement.  The initial statement of
>>the theme
>>entails, of course, the presence of the object (Da!), followed by
>>digressions
>>and complications and variations that arouse a feeling of lostness and
>>separation anxiety (Fort!), followed by a reassuring reassertion of the
>>theme
>>(Da!).
>
>Christopher Small (_Musiking_, Weslyean 1998, p. 160) says that the
>symphonic "meta-narrative" is this:
>
>Order is established.
>Order is disturbed.
>Order is reestablished.
>
>Sorta reminds you of"
>
>Boy meets girl.
>Boy loses girl.
>Boy regains girl.
>
>Ahhh... the classics!
>
>BB
>
>William L. Benzon          201.217.1010

I suppose the standard Blues chord progressions (eg I,IV,V,I) replicate
the
symphonic 'meta-narrative' by establishing order in the tonic chord,
disturbing it in the subdominant and dominant and then reestablishing it
in
the return to the tonic. Or....the tonic is lost in the move to the
subdominant/dominant to be refound in the tonic. The subdominant
expresses
loss, the tonic reassures that all is not lost.

I also wonder if this reassuring  'refinding' in southern blues forms
(that
Don alludes to) and that is expressed in common Blues progressions could
only evolve into the disturbing freedoms of jazz after the blues
musicians
of the southern states had migrated north, resettled and  emotionally
'refound'  music-generating environments.

Mike