Print

Print


The only thing I find a bit overboard about locking a student out of a
class is many times people do have a legitimate reason for being late. For
example, the babysitter didn't show up and they had to find someone else
quickly or they were held up by an accident (a common occurance in
Pittsburgh). These are excuses an employer would except if you didn't do
it too often. I think the best way is what some people already stated.
Make your expectations known on your syllabus and on the first day.

Barbara M. Stout
Supplemental Instructional Specialist
University of Pittsburgh
311 Wm. Pitt Union
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
1-412-648-7920

On Wed, 3 Nov 1999, Motyka/MathCenter wrote:

> Steve Runge said:
> >>It sounds like a few legends about stern disciplinarians
> >>is enough to keep us from having to be ogres.
>
> A faculty member here brought an end to students arriving to class late by
> getting keys for all her classrooms and locking the door when class began.
> I was surprised (should I have been?) when the students complained about
> things like whose watch she was going by. One student even rattled the door
> for a few moments and then went and got a janitor to let him into the room.
> But all this eventually stopped. She has not had to lock a door in 2
> semesters and has no problem with lateness anymore. She has her reputation
> now.
>
> In comparison to offering rewards for behavior which should not need to be
> rewarded (bonus points for perfect attendance, etc.), the repercussions for
> unaccepatable behavior were stressed - if you're late, you are absent and
> still responsible for the work. I think it sends a stronger message when
> there is a price to be paid for wrong behavior instead of prizes awarded
> for behavior which should have been there in the first place.
>
> Andrea Motyka
>
> Director of Math Center
> Washington College
> Chestertown, MD 21628
> 410.778.7862
>