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Annette

You are right. As a college teacher I can attest to that. Most of the lack of
motivation I referred to was in dealing with the 18-24 year olds. The adult
leaners appear to be much more self-directed (according to Knowles and Candy
and Merriam and Caffarella's theories on self-directed learning).  I am sorry
if my post was not clear. I deserve 30 lashes with the Eiffel Tower-:) France


===== Original Message From Open Forum for Learning Assistance Professionals
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>To add to the issue of motivation/acculturation, I wish to point out
>that students are not monolithic.  We speak as if most of our
>developmental students are 18 years old and just out of high school.
>At my community college, most of my students are mid-20's through
>30's.  They are highly motivated to change their lives and correct
>the mistakes of the past.  They are not in the same attitudinal
>place as the "kids."
>
>Motivation is complicated, too.  My students are highly motivated
>to make their lives better.  That doesn't mean they are intrinsically
>motivated to love the math I teach them for its own sake.  I think
>part of my job is to show them reasons it's worth valuing the
>subject and to help them overcome their fears and defenses.
>Sometimes that reaches them, sometimes it doesn't.  But I also
>think they have a right not to like it in the end, and to be going to
>school for different reasons than I did.  Ultimately their motivations
>are their own business, as long as they know what is expected for class.
>
>Annette Gourgey

Je pense, donc, je suis, Rene Descarte
Chacun ont deux pays et un de ils est France, Benjamin Franklin
vive la France